Challenges and Solutions to Eating Like Our Ancestors Did

EATING SEASONALLY

Challenge:

For the vast majority of the population, who use the supermarkets to do all their food shopping, seasonal eating is no longer a consideration. With the modern practices of cold storage and vast food mileage items, the notion of only eating what is in season is no longer a consideration. We now have access to watermelons in the middle of winter and apples 365 days of the year.

Solution:

The best way in which you can encourage an accurately seasonal diet is to have your own vegetable garden and orchard.

If this is not possible then seeking out a local farmers market and purchasing your food from someone that is growing fresh seasonal produce in your local area.

A third suggestion is to print out a seasonal food guide for your area and stick it up in your kitchen. This will be an easy reference as to which foods would currently be in season. Use this information when making up your shopping list.

EASY ACCESS TO FOOD

Challenge:

Our ancestors once had to put considerable effort into accessing foods, whereas nowadays the majority of the Western World has very quick, easy and cheap access to food 24 hours a day. Our ancestors would have had natural periods of fasting due to a failed hunt or due to lean harvesting times. These fasting periods were a natural and necessary requirement by the body to allow times for performing other tasks besides digestion. However now we see extreme health problems arising from the constant and vast quantities of food being consumed.

Solution:

Awareness around eating smaller meals, and allowing the body to actually become hungry before you feed it.

Education around periods of fasting.

QUALITY OF OUR FOOD

Challenge:

Our ancestors ONLY had access to real, organic foods. Nowadays the prevalence of consumable food items, which the body barely recognizes as food, is vast. The diet of our population is often made up of consumable items that are genetically modified, chemically saturated, highly processed and completely devoid of anything derived from our natural world.

Solution:

In Australia, beautifully fresh, organic, grass fed produce is available to those that make it a priority.

WILD MEAT versus FARMED MEAT

Challenge:

The wild caught meats, that our ancestors used to eat, grazed on a diet that was varied and natural pertaining to the seasons. During the summer months they had a higher fat content and conversely during the winter months they were leaner. Our bodies were biologically in tune with this rhythm. Nowadays our farmed meats are fed grass for a period, if lucky, and then are fattened up on a grain based diet that is unnatural for them. This means that the vast majority of available meat comes from unnaturally raised, sick animals. The same applies to our seafood. Wild caught fish has a varied, natural diet, whereas farmed fish is fed all sorts of unnatural foods. It is also worth considering the vast quantities of chemical exposure that these animals endure, be it through their food source or antibiotics, and consequently pass onto the consumer.

Solution:

Seek out organic, free range, grass fed meats and wild caught seafood.

EATING CULTURALLY

Challenge:

We now live in such a global world that we have easy access to foods that originate from every corner of the plant. For example, those that live in the colder southern states of Victoria have year round access to tropical fruits from the far north of Queensland. A Further consequence to our global world is the relocation of people from very differing cultures into a completely foreign culinary world. For example it is likely that a Japanese person relocating to Australia would be exposed to a completely different way of eating, a way of eating that would be an enormous challenge to the microbiome they inherited and created through their ancestors and their upbringing on a traditional Japanese diet.

Solution:

Awareness around what foods are best suited to the individual.

A positive consequence of our global world is relatively easy access to culturally different foods.

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